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What campus protests mean for business

General Catalyst’s Ken Chenault & General Catalyst’s Ken Frazier

Business leaders face new pressure on whether to take action on the issues of our time. Ken Frazier and Ken Chenault offer their unfiltered advice as two of America’s most prominent executives.

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Who really won The Oscars

The Black List’s Franklin Leonard

Rapid Response host Bob Safian digs into the business implications of the Academy Awards with incisive Hollywood observer Franklin Leonard, founder and CEO of The Black List.

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Podcast: Episode 136: Must Listen

Tap into collective genius

Girls Who Code’s Reshma Saujani

Reshma Saujani reveals how she’s built inclusive networks of collaborators to tackle intractable problems from unexpected angles and unlock massive opportunities.

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Confronting Elon Musk

Anti-Defamation League’s Jonathan Greenblatt

Anti-Defamation League’s Jonathan Greenblatt shares how business leaders must ignite hope in the face of hate to build a brighter future.

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Podcast: Must Listen

How the word “no” inspires change

Saudi Arabia’s Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud

To change the status quo, we need to lean into whatever advantages we have. Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud of Saudi Arabia has privileges that many do not: She is a member of the royal family and Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to the United States. But she is also a woman in a traditional culture who has encountered many obstacles — as an entrepreneur, a CEO, and in government. Princess Reema has deftly maneuvered to help expand women’s rights in Saudi Arabia, in ways few predicted. Recorded live at the Masters of Scale Summit in San Francisco, Princess Reema talks with host Bob Safian about how anyone can use their advantages to push the boundary of what’s possible.

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Finding untapped value in multicultural consumers

Blavity’s Morgan DeBaun

While media companies from CNN to Buzzfeed have faced layoffs, one digital network focused on Black millennials has continued to forge ahead. Morgan DeBaun, CEO of Blavity, which reaches some 100 million users through brands like Travel Noire and Afrotech, has defied the odds — repeatedly. Morgan’s experience offers lessons about financial discipline and focused patience, as well as the untapped value in multicultural consumers. An adviser to big companies like American Airlines and an advocate for the Black tech community, Morgan illuminates how openness and opportunity reinforce each other, for enterprises at all scales.

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Expand your definition of leadership

CNBC’s Julia Boorstin

Despite only 8% of Fortune 500 companies with women CEOs, women leaders more often utilize leadership skills that are perfectly suited for the current business climate. Julia Boorstin, who created CNBC’s Disruptor 50 platform, argues in her new book When Women Lead that counterintuitive approaches used by women leaders can have a great impact on business, and can be learned by anyone. Julia, as a senior tech and media reporter, also offers her in-depth knowledge on big tech from Twitter, Meta, and TikTok.

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Rally a team in turmoil

Las Vegas Raiders’ Sandra Douglass Morgan

As a new leader, how do you honor an established brand while trying to shepherd it into the next era? Las Vegas Raiders’ president Sandra Douglass Morgan took the helm amid a front office scandal and a team new to the desert. Morgan talks about prioritizing customers over all else, taking risks at the beginning of a new venture, and why to bet on yourself from the moment you apply for a job.

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Holding business accountable from Meta to McDonald’s

Color Of Change’s Rashad Robinson

When it comes to racial justice, many companies and organizations haven’t matched their reality to their words. Rashad Robinson, the president of Color of Change, the largest online racial justice organization in the U.S., is holding major corporations accountable. Hear Rashad talk through the difficulties of changing systems from Hollywood, Silicon Valley, to Washington DC, getting help from President Barack Obama, and what business leaders can do to actively change racial injustice.

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Don’t wait for the system, build it!

Genius Guild’s Kathryn Finney

Entrepreneurship is an essential tool for building a more equitable society — which is why Kathryn Finney is laser-focused on encouraging people who don’t fit the mold of the stereotypical founder to jump in. Her new book, “Build the Damn Thing,” taps into wisdom from her years at the venture studio Genius Guild and beyond. She brings a message to founders: The universe is conspiring for your greatness.

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