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Mark Pincus

Mark Pincus founded Zynga in 2011, launching the social games FarmVille and Words with Friends. Four years after founding, the company went public with a $1 billion IPO. Today, more than 55 million Words with Friends matches are played at any given moment. Mark previously founded Freeloader, Inc., Support.com and the social network Tribe.

“I’ll try anything, and I’ll kill anything. And I’ll kill it quickly.”

— Mark Pincus
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Featured in these episodes:
Mark Pincus, guest
July 25, 2018

To succeed, you have to be relentless about pursuing a big opportunity — and ruthless about killing your own bad ideas along the way. Zynga founder Mark Pincus up-ended the gaming industry with social games like Farmville and Words with Friends. And he did it by gathering data; killing ideas that didn’t move the needle, and going all-in on the ones that did.

Mark Pincus, cameo
September 5, 2019

When Drew Houston founded Dropbox, he knew he faced some fierce competition (hello, Google, Apple, and Microsoft). But he didn’t back down from the fight. Why? Because he believed in his product, and he knew he had an advantage those big, cumbersome competitors could never exploit: Dropbox was lean, focused, and fast. Hear how he outmaneuvered the big guys – and what’s next for Dropbox. Cameo appearances: Mark Pincus of Zynga, Shellye Archambeau of MetricStream.

Mark Pincus, cameo
January 8, 2019

That constant roar of customer feedback? Be thankful for it. It holds all the secrets to your success, if you learn how to read the signs. Listen to what users say, sure. But also watch what they do and interpret what they need. Eventbrite’s Julia Hartz embodies this principle. She believes passionately in learning from her customers, and has made rapid response to user feedback the driving force behind Eventbrite’s strategy — as it grew from a simple ticketing app to a full-service platform for event creators, offering everything from ticket sales to custom-made RFID readers.

Mark Pincus, cameo
June 7, 2017

Google doesn’t tell its employees how to innovate; it manages their inventive chaos. Their secret? Mix free-flowing ideas with disciplined decision-making. Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google since 2001 and now chair of parent company Alphabet, shares the decision he made to support a crazy idea that he was certain would bankrupt the company.